Childnet Film Competition - 2019 Winners Announced

Online safety films created by young people are set to be used as educational resources across the UK, as Childnet announce winners of the 2019 national online safety Film Competition.

Leading online safety charity Childnet recently announced the winners of the tenth annual Childnet Film Competition. Representatives from government, industry, charities and wider attended the event alongside the competition finalists at the British Film Institute (BFI).

Each year the Childnet Film Competition invites schools and youth organisations from across the UK to capture their internet safety messages in a short film. The two winning films and four finalists are decided by a panel of industry experts and will see their films used to educate other young people about online safety and inspire others to use the internet positively and safely.

Childnet Film Competition inspiring young people since 2010

For the past 10 years the Childnet Film Competition has harnessed the positive role of peer-to-peer education and provide a creative and inclusive approach to empower and inspire young people aged 7-18 to use technology safely, positively and creatively.

With over 100 entries across both the primary and secondary categories, this year we have seen young people create an amazing variety of films ranging from news reports to animations. The films look at young people’s vision for a better internet, and the young people have been very creative in thinking about some key things a safer internet in the future looks like to them.

The winners of this year’s Film Competition were Sandown Primary School in the primary category with their film ‘The Internet Belongs to me, and this is how it's going to be’. In the secondary category, the winners were Christleton High School with their film ‘New Tools, Better Outcomes’.

This year BBC Own It will also showcase the finalists’ films, providing a unique opportunity for the young people to reach even more of their peers with their online safety messages.

Will Gardner, CEO of Childnet, said:
“Over the last 10 years we have seen some amazing films entered in the competition, and it is so exciting to see how these have changed over the years. The 2019 Film Competition has seen some really inspiring entries, which show creative skills and a real passion for online safety and educating their peers. Each year we run this competition we have had great support, including from our excellent team of judges.

We have seen the impact that these films can have, with many schools across the UK using them as educational tools. The finalists' event was a great opportunity for the young people to see their films on the big screen at the BFI and to celebrate their creativity and achievements.”

The Minister Nadhim Zahawi MP, Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Children and Families, gave his thoughts on the event:
“The competition’s theme, “Our Future Online”, is one that we fully support at the Department for Education. Well done on putting your time, energy and creativity into coming up with ideas for making the internet a better place for us all. (...)Whoever wins today, you are all inspiring. Wherever I go in the UK, I am always energised and rejuvenated by meeting young people like you. And it fills me with confidence for the future of our internet knowing that it will be in your generation’s hands.”

Judged by a panel of experts
The films were judged by Lisa Prime Children’s Events Programmer at the British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), Catherine McAllister Head of Safeguarding and Child Protection BBC Children’s, David Austin OBE Chief Executive at the BBFC, and Joanna van der Meer Film Tutor and Family Learning Programmer at BFI Southbank.

The winning films from the Childnet Film Competition can be viewed here: www.childnet.com/film-competition

Written by Childnet International on July 18, 2019 12:33

Young people across Europe call on adults to help them tackle sexual harassment online

Young people in the UK, Hungary and Denmark have come together to tackle online sexual harassment and what they need from adults to help them to put an end to it.


Project deShame‘Support us every step of the way, even if you think we may have done something wrong’ – young person from Denmark

The film has been created as part of Project deSHAME, a Europe-wide project to tackle sexual harassment carried out by young people online. Defined as ‘unwanted sexual conduct on any online platform’, online sexual harassment amongst young people is an increasingly present issue in schools and local communities. Each of the countries involved in Project deSHAME consulted an advisory board made up of young people to ensure that these resources were reflective of young people experiences.

Our research found that 51% of respondents aged 13-17 years said they have witnessed people their age circulating nude or nearly nude images of someone they know, with 10% of UK teens receiving sexual threats online. However young people in the UK said that they were more likely to ignore online sexual harassment than to speak to their parents or carers, with 49% not telling their parents as they were worried that they would then stop them from using the internet.

This film is designed to inspire change among young people, so that they feel empowered to step up to online sexual harassment, whether that is through reporting to social media, the police or a trusted adult.

Will Gardner, CEO of Childnet, and coordinator of Project deSHAME said:
"This film is a direct call to action from young people to put an end to online sexual harassment. We know that young people are passionate about making a real difference online and this film will act as an inspiration for those who watch it. The power of this film is that it gives us the unique opportunity to hear directly from young people about what they need from the adults in their lives, whether that is their parents, carers, teachers, youth workers and as well as the internet industry. It’s clear that all of us must act now to put an end to online sexual harassment.”

What young people want adults to do

During the creation of this film the young people told us what they wanted adults to do if a young person came to them after facing sexual harassment online. This is what they said:

  1. Supports us every step of the way, even if you think we may have done something wrong
  2. To not get angry or overreact if we tell you something that shocks you
  3. Gain knowledge about social media and the digital world we identify with
  4. We need you to be a figure of support and not a figure of authority
  5. Explain to us what help there is, and how we can get it
  6. To know that you’re going to take it seriously, not brush it off
  7. To make us feel safe
  8. To reassure us that you’re going to help

56% of young people in the UK said that embarrassment was the main reason they would not report online sexual harassment. Project deSHAME has worked with young people and professionals to develop practical resources to instigate open and regular conversations about this issue.

Resources to help parents and carers

To help parents and carers to support their children with some of the issues raised in this film Childnet have created a new resource outlining further information about sexting.

This ‘Hot Topic’ contains statistics about sexting among young people, answers some FAQs that parents may have and then breaks down guidance for parents into age appropriate sections, including tailored advice for:

  • 3-7 year olds
  • 7-11 year olds
  • 11-14 year olds
  • 14-18 year olds
  • There is also guidance to help parents who discover that their child’s nude image has been shared online.

    Written by Childnet International on May 24, 2019 09:10

    Myth vs Reality - New toolkit from Childnet

    Childnet launches new resources to support young people as only 15% of 11-14s say they know where to go to find reliable information about sex and relationships.

    Children’s charity Childnet launch new resources to address online pornography, healthy relationships and body image online.

    Brand new resources have been launched by children’s charity Childnet, as part of its work in the UK Safer Internet Centre. The ‘Myth vs Reality’ toolkit covers the issues of pornography, healthy relationships and body image and is designed to be used with young people aged 11-14.

    Whilst 80% of 11-14s surveyed by Childnet said it was important or extremely important for young people to discuss the issues related to online pornography, only 15% said they knew where to go to find reliable information about sex and relationships. After taking part in the activities, 77% of those surveyed felt they knew where to go to find reliable information about sex and relationships.

    Following on from the huge success of the ‘Crossing the Line’ toolkit launched in 2016, which covered the issues of sexting, peer pressure, cyberbullying and self-esteem, this new toolkit includes a range of videos, quick activities and adaptable lesson plans based on the real experiences of young people.

    The toolkit was created following focus groups conducted in five schools across the UK, where young people expressed the need for education about the portrayal of gender, bodies and relationships online with a particular need for education about the reality of online pornography.

    One boy aged between 11 -13 in a focus group stated that: “the less educated people are about sex and relationships the more they are going to try and look for it.”

    With Relationship and Sex Education (RSE) becoming statutory in all schools from September 2020, these resources provide schools with much needed practical, thoughtful and helpful resources to support them in teaching RSE. It also comes as the UK prepares to be the first country in the world to implement an age-verification system for online pornography.

    The toolkit has been tested in seven schools across the UK where both teachers and pupils tried out the resources and provided feedback about the impact it had had in their school.

    Research was conducted with young people aged 11-14 before they completed the toolkit, providing over 600 responses:

  • 80% said it was important or extremely important for young people to discuss the issues related to online pornography, but only 15% said they knew where to go to find reliable information about sex and relationships
  • Only 23 % said that they could recognise the difference between what is considered the ‘ideal’ body image online and the reality of a realistic and healthy body
  • Only 23% said that they knew what makes a healthy relationship online
  • After taking part in the activities in the toolkit, young people aged 11-14 reported on the impact that it had, with over 450 responses. Schools saw an increase in confidence and knowledge of the issues in the toolkit:

  • 90% said they now felt confident in supporting themselves and others with the issues related to online pornography
  • 77% said they know where to go to find reliable information about sex and relationships
  • 69% said the lessons made them feel more confident in supporting my friends online when it came to issues around body image
  • 59% felt confident in supporting themselves and others with unhealthy relationships online
  • Will Gardner OBE, CEO of Childnet and Director of the UK Safer Internet Centre, said:
    “The issues that affect young people online are changing and are complex. It is vital that all young people are given the opportunity to discuss the pressures they face online, and develop the skills to spot and understand the gap between perception and reality.

    We have created this toolkit to support and empower educators in exploring these challenging and often interrelating topics with confidence, and to allow them to help their pupils develop the strategies they need to navigate the online world. It’s clear from those schools who have taken part that these resources are much needed and can have a real impact on the lives of young people.”

    One secondary school teacher from Gravesend said:
    “The pupils loved the lessons and one year 9 class asked me when the next lesson was. When I said it was a one-off they said 'we need more lessons like this'. (…) Thank you so much for asking us to be part of the trial - I also learnt a lot."

    A year 9 pupil commenting on the healthy relationships activities said that: "This lesson helps people who are silently struggling. I learnt about how communication, respect, trust and boundaries are key."

    Another young person said, “I learnt what [pornography is] about and where I could go if I needed to talk about it or needed help and that you don't need to look a certain way for other people."

    For more information on how the toolkit can be used in education settings read this piece on ‘How teachers can use the ‘Myth vs Reality’ toolkit’

    Written by Childnet International on May 02, 2019 12:25


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